Deutsche Bank

Human Resources
Report 2015

Advancing standards and fostering leadership

Diversity is embedded in our people processes – from recruitment to leadership development – and reflected in all HR-related offerings, including parental leave, coaching and part-time job schemes. Managers are responsible for fostering diverse capabilities and leading inclusively, with hiring and promotion programs also reflecting key aspects of the Bank’s diversity principles.

The “Managing Unconscious Bias” workshop for Managing Directors and Directors in Germany has been met with strong demand, with around 50% of the target audience having participated as of year-end 2015. Participation in the global e-learning program “Great Minds Don’t Think Alike – The power of different perspectives” increased to around 8,190 as of year-end 2015 (2014: approximately 6,000). Furthermore, Deutsche Bank created a new workshop focused on moving from awareness to action, “From Unconscious Bias to Inclusive Leadership”, targeted at managers from Vice President to Managing Director level. The year 2015 also saw the launch of dbMomentum in the U.S., a cross-divisional program for high-performing employees of color at Vice President level.

Global reach and regional focus

The Bank has further aligned its activities to country-specific or regional requirements. For example, a new cross-divisional initiative in Germany – Working@DB 4.0 – responds to demands and needs arising from mega trends including digitalization and demographic changes as well as a growing expectation by employees to enjoy a healthy work-life balance. This is of particular importance for workforce planning and development, accounting for aspects such as the impact of digitalization and a multi-generational workforce on talent retention and leadership behavior. Following the 2015 launch, the initiative delivered a number of quick results and mid- to long-term initiatives, including knowledge transfer tools, fostering cross-divisional internal career paths and specific measures to maintain the motivation and employability of staff aged 50+. In close cooperation with the Bank’s social partners as well as internal and external experts, Working@DB 4.0 will continue in 2016.

Age diversity has been a particular focus in Germany, given that employees’ average age and length of company service there is higher than in other regions. Deutsche Bank offers active support throughout the working lifecycle of its staff. It also fosters dialogue and knowledge transfer between younger and older generations as well as offering flexible work solutions for employees. See also chapter Long-term perspective to managing change

Age

In %, headcount

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

Up to 29 years

18.4%

18.8%

18.9%

19.8%

21.0%

30 – 39 years

29.7%

29.3%

29.2%

29.4%

29.4%

40 – 49 years

28.6%

29.6%

30.6%

30.8%

30.7%

Over 49 years

23.3%

22.3%

21.3%

20.0%

18.9%

Average age by region

In years, headcount

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

Germany

44.3

44.0

43.9

43.2

42.9

Europe (excluding Germany), Middle East and Africa

39.8

39.7

39.5

39.0

38.6

Americas

40.5

40.4

40.3

39.9

39.5

Asia-Pacific

33.6

33.2

33.0

32.9

32.6

Total

40.9

40.7

40.6

40.1

39.8

The Bank has also increased efforts to ensure male staff are included in discussions and benefits relating to, for example, parental leave, childcare and part-time job schemes. See also chapter Global benefits for employees In the Asia-Pacific region, men have been addressed through various initiatives and the topic featured prominently on the agenda of the Bank’s fifth annual Women in Asian Business conference.

Engaging with internal and external communities

In 2015, Deutsche Bank celebrated its fifth annual Global Diversity Week, encompassing topics from age and gender diversity to inclusion. Employees from more than 35 countries participated in around 350 events and activities worldwide. In addition to the Asia forum, the 21st Women on Wall Street conference was held.

The Bank actively supports LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersexual) initiatives around the world. It takes part in several events every year, with many activities led by or involving dbPride, the dedicated employee resource group for LGBTI employees and their allies. Deutsche Bank has received various accolades honoring its commitment to LGBTI causes. For example, it was awarded the maximum score of 100 in the Human Rights Campaign’s annual Corporate Equality Index for the 13th consecutive year.

maximum score of 100 in the Human Rights Campaign’s annual Corporate Equality Index for the 13th consecutive year

There are various – largely cross-regional – resource groups for employees at Deutsche Bank, focused on topics including women, veterans, families or multicultural backgrounds. The Bank’s efforts to embed diversity and inclusion across the organization are widely recognized. In October 2015, dbGO in the UK was named among the top ten female employee networks on the inaugural Global Diversity List, supported by The Economist. The group, 26% of whose 1,000 members are male, has four key objectives: inspiration, visibility, career development and influence.

Another resource group, dbEnable, deals with disability in the workplace. In Germany, HR also works closely with the representative body for disabled employees as well as sheltered workshops in order to promote the employment of disabled people. See also chapter Collaboration with social partners