Deutsche Bank

Human Resources
Report 2017

Building a pipeline of young talent

Graduates

In line with our commitment to building future talent, Deutsche Bank hired 619 graduates in 2017, compared to 813 the prior year. The decrease is in part due to the revised hiring targets and changes to our global footprint.

The global graduate training program started with a three-day orientation event in London to introduce the bank’s structure, strategy and culture as well as to explain what is expected of the new joiners and enable them to start building networks with their peers across the organization. Delivery methods included keynote speeches, Q&As and panel discussions with the Management Board, as well as modules delivered by a variety of external training providers. Following the orientation, graduates went through a classroom-based training program for up to four weeks comprising project work, case studies and presentations. This was followed by a 12-month online continuous development program, anchored in the bank’s values and beliefs, providing graduates with the technical as well as professional and cultural skills to launch their careers successfully.

Talent acquisition
Talent acquisition (bar chart)Talent acquisition (bar chart)

Underlining the need for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) profiles across all businesses of Deutsche Bank, 40% of the entire 2017 class has a STEM degree – and 30% of the bank’s graduate intake was into technology roles. The share of female graduates in the new class is 37% (compared to close to 39% in 2016).

In graduate recruitment we have developed the innovative app “I am DB”, which allows us to engage in dialogue with our recent recruits prior to their start date. This pre-employment engagement period can last around 12 months. The material we share through the app, such as stories from previous graduates or business cases, helps the new joiners to familiarize themselves with the bank. They get to know the organization’s values and beliefs and begin to feel like a part of the Deutsche Bank family. In addition, the app enables them to network and exchange views with other graduates, which also makes for a smoother onboarding process. After all, the credibility of fellow graduates is several times higher than glossy brochures and company presentations can ever be. The bank has been recognized for the app, which was named “Best Customer and Employee Engagement in Financial Services” at the 2017 Engage Awards in the UK.

Apprentices and dual students

Dual vocational training for high school and middle school graduates represents an additional source of junior talent – mainly in Germany – and forms part of Deutsche Bank’s ongoing commitment to developing young people and promoting the attractiveness of jobs in the banking sector.

The past years have seen a significant change in the way the banking profession is perceived, and the shift is ongoing. Digitalization and mobile banking solutions are major contributing factors to a working environment within the bank’s branches that has been greatly transformed in recent years.

In Germany, the apprenticeship program consists of on-the-job training at the bank and learning modules provided by a vocational school, concluding with a commercial degree. Dual students graduate with a bachelor’s degree. They attend theoretical training modules at partner universities. The practical training is conducted at the bank. The programs provide young talents the opportunity to build capabilities for a specific professional role as well as to develop key soft skills.

Due to the changes within the banking sector and structural adjustments in the private banking business, the total number of new apprentices continues to decrease. The bank hired 616 new apprentices in 2017 (2016: 741). At the same time, the number of young people taken over into permanent/temporary employment after completing their training remained on a high level at 460 (2016: 419). Generally, Deutsche Bank provides apprenticeships beyond its own recruitment needs, as it is committed to offering high-quality education and career opportunities to young people.

Apprentices in Germany

 

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

*

Excluding Postbank

Number of apprentices

1,641

1,902

1,936

1,818

1,849

Female share of apprentices

47.0%

46.0%

44.6%

45.8%

46.1%

Apprentices ratio

3.6%

3.9%

4.0%

3.8%

3.8%

Hired apprentices

616

741

863

832

655

Takeover of apprentices into employment

460

419

475

489

488

Share of apprentices taken over into employment*

50%

52%

70%

59%

55%

Expenses for apprenticeship programs in € m

48

51

45

41

46

Ø Expenses for apprenticeship programs per employee (apprentice) in € k

28

30

27

26

27