Deutsche Bank

Human Resources
Report 2017

Fostering an inclusive workplace across generations

With the ageing Baby Boomer population who work and live longer than prior generations and a Millennial generation that will comprise 75% of the global workforce by 2025, the inter-generational realities of a changing workforce need to be considered. Deutsche Bank’s employee base spans four generations.

As of year-end 2017, 26.0% of Deutsche Bank’s workforce was 49 years of age or over (2016: 24.8%), with the youngest group of employees – up to 29 years of age – accounting for 16.2% (2016: 17.1%). The average age in Germany was 45.5 years (2016: 44.9) which, along with the average length of company service, is significantly higher than in other regions.

Age

Headcount

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

up to 29 years

16.2%

17.1%

18.4%

18.8%

18.9%

30 – 39 years

30.1%

29.9%

29.7%

29.3%

29.2%

40 – 49 years

27.7%

28.2%

28.6%

29.6%

30.6%

over 49 years

26.0%

24.8%

23.3%

22.3%

21.3%

Average age by region

in years, headcount

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

Germany

45.4

44.9

44.3

44.0

43.9

Europe (excluding Germany), Middle East and Africa

40.7

40.2

39.8

39.7

39.5

Americas

40.9

40.4

40.5

40.4

40.3

Asia-Pacific

34.5

34.2

33.6

33.2

33.0

Total

41.7

41.3

40.9

40.7

40.6

Length of company service

in headcount

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

up to 4 years

34.5%

34.2%

34.8%

33.8%

32.8%

5 – 14 years

27.3%

27.3%

27.5%

29.3%

31.4%

more than 14 years

38.2%

38.5%

37.7%

37.0%

35.7%

Average length of company service by region

in years, headcount

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

Germany

19.6

19.1

18.5

18.4

18.1

Europe (excluding Germany), Middle East and Africa

10.3

10.2

10.0

10.2

10.3

Americas

7.5

7.4

7.5

7.8

7.9

Asia-Pacific

5.2

5.1

4.8

4.8

4.7

Total

13.4

13.2

12.9

13.1

13.0

Cross-generational mentoring schemes are in place in Germany and the US, where employees with different amounts of experience collaborate in tandems. One of the positive outcomes of these programs was the idea of reverse mentoring. The bank’s Global Transaction Banking business and its generations employee resource group (NextGen) launched a program that inverted traditional mentoring relationships with Millennials mentoring Baby Boomers. Deutsche Bank ensures that the knowledge and business experience of its employees is captured and shared appropriately. For instance, the bank launched a Guide to Know-how Transfer in Germany that actively promotes a culture of knowledge sharing.

Employees also enjoy active support throughout their working lifecycle which includes programs to help employees deal with family responsibilities, for example DB India introduced a preferred pricing structure and a subsidy for day care centers locally. We also offer a range of flexible work solutions for employees as part of our benefits programs.